22 Comments

  1. bsieger007
    August 27, 2017 @ 11:50 am

    Changes In Google Country Settings when Doing Searches in Domains Other Than Your Own Region

    FROM JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP DIGEST 10/29/17

    Many of us use Google for genealogically-relevant searches. For those who
    visit Google in different domains, this is of interest. Different domains
    could be:Google.com (USA); Google.ca (Canada) google. Fr (France);
    Google.co.il (Israel) Google.de (Germany), Google.co.uk (United Kingdom),
    Google.com.au (Australia), etc. as of October 27 you may no longer receive
    localized results by visiting the different domains. Typing in URL country
    codes will no longer work. Instead Google will deliver search results only
    relevant to your current location no matter which domain you visit.

    You will be able to change your country’s results by changing the settings
    menu at the bottom of google.com or whichever google domain is your
    country’s domain.

    1. Go to your usual Google page ( in my case google.com)
    2. At the bottom of the page on desk tops and scroll down on mobile phones
    where on the lower right is the word “settings”.
    3. Click on settings,
    4. Then click on “search settings”.
    5.On the search setting page scroll down to “region settings”
    6. On region settings to stay where you are , click on “current region” to
    change to a different country click on the name of the Country.
    7. Click on Save.
    The saved setting are available whenever you sign-in. If after you do a
    search on the saved country you wish to revert to your “current region” or
    another country you need to click on that named button and save.

    Google says they are doing this because one out of five searches is related
    to location.

    Regarding the European Union’s “right to be forgotten” and the removal of
    specific results, the users will see removed results appropriate for their
    set location. However, if the country they’re physically in requires
    results to be removed no matter what, then results will get stripped out
    regardless of which location they choose.

    Google already uses this process for Gmail and YouTube. It will also apply
    to Google Maps and IOS Google app.

    To read about this see: http://tinyurl.com/ydg8rbw4
    Original url:

    https://www.blog.google/products/search/making-search-results-more-local-and-relevant/

    Jan Meisels Allen
    Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

    Reply

  2. bsieger007
    August 28, 2017 @ 2:04 pm

    Subscribe to JewishGen Mailing Lists & Discussion INCLUDING THE DNA TEST SITE

    Click on the following link to subscribe to the many helpful JewishGen Mailing Lists & Discussion Groups:
    https://www.jewishgen.org/ListManager/members_add.asp

    There is a DNA TESTING group, to which you can join, make comments and ask questions. I have already joined today and uploaded a question about Centimorgans. These are, of course, free but you would still have to register on JewishGen.

    Reply

  3. bsieger007
    August 29, 2017 @ 2:22 pm

    INDEX OF CONTENTS

    Subscribe to JewishGen Mailing Lists

    PRACTICING SAFE COMPUTING, by Hal Bookbinder, recent speaker in our Workshop Series

    FREE HOW-TO VIDEOS – WELL-DONE – ON A VARIETY OF GENEALOGICAL TOPICS BY THE JEWISH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONG ISLAND (JGSLI)

    Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay Meeting 10/8/2017

    Salvaging Water Damaged Documents, Photographs and Heirlooms

    How to Find Polish Archival Records That Have Been Indexed on JewishGen

    ONLINE RECORDS AND INDEXES – A TREASURY OF INFORMATION

    Family Tree Webinars

    WORKSHOP ON ‘CHANGES OF BORDERS’ GIVEN February 7, 2017

    2 GREAT NEW DOCUMENTS – DNA RESOURCES & TOM HIRSCH’S WEB SITE LIST

  4. Ancestry Genealogy Toolkit
  5. Ancestry Genealogy Toolkit

    The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter Article: How to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets

    FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE 18 GREAT TIPS FOR ALL OF US

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM)

    RESEARCH YOUR ROOTS ON JEWISHGEN – new course begins 11/1/2017

    Subscribe to JewishGen Mailing Lists & Discussion INCLUDING THE DNA TEST SITE

Reply

  • bsieger007
    August 30, 2017 @ 10:22 am

    PRACTICING SAFE COMPUTING, by Hal Bookbinder, recent speaker in our Workshop Series

    THIS IS AN EXCELLENT ONGOING SERIES OF ARTICLES ON AVOIDING VIRUSES & MALWARE

    Dear IAJGS Leaders,

    I have written a series of short articles on Practicing Safe Computing which have appeared monthly in “Venturing Into Our Past”, the Newsletter of the JGSCV. The seventeen articles published to date have now been consolidated into a single PDF document with an internal index to quickly locate each article. This resource is freely accessible on the JGSCV web site. I plan to add articles over the coming months. Consider placing a link to it on your society web sites, providing convenient access for your members. Check it out at http://www.jgscv.org/pdf/Practicing%20Safe%20Computing%20Articles.pdf. Hope you and your members find this to be a worthwhile resource. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.

    Hal Bookbinder

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 3, 2017 @ 10:56 am

    FREE HOW-TO VIDEOS – WELL-DONE – ON A VARIETY OF GENEALOGICAL TOPICS BY THE JEWISH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONG ISLAND (JGSLI)

    CLICK ON EITHER OF THE FOLLOWING:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUV8xttIn93AwJX2_I0AIAg/feed or tiny url: https://tinyurl.com/z8kpgka

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUV8xttIn93AwJX2_I0AIAg/feed

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 10, 2017 @ 1:51 pm

    Salvaging Water Damaged Documents, Photographs and Heirlooms
    FROM JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP BLOG 9/9/17 (as Irma is moving in)

    Subject: Salvaging Water Damaged Documents, Photographs and Heirlooms
    From: “Jan Meisels Allen”
    Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2017 14:55:29 -0700
    X-Message-Number: 3

    With the recent hurricanes in the United States, the posting by the National
    Genealogical Society about Salvaging Water Damaged Documents, Photographs
    and Heirlooms is very timely. The NGS article refers to suggestions from
    FEMA, Library of Congress, Ancestry blog, American Institute for
    Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and more. Even if you do not
    live in the current-hurricane damaged areas, water damage can occur for
    other reasons and whether it’s your personal property or belongs to your
    society or local archive it is good to know how to salvage and protect your
    documents, photographs and heirlooms.

    To read the article go to: http://upfront.ngsgenealogy.org/
    The date of the article is September 9, 2017.

    Here’s is the link to the FEMA’s actual article, which you can download:
    https://secureservercdn.net/184.168.47.225/ba9.c9c.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Salvaging_Family_Valuables_FIMA_Fact_Sheet_2017_508WDU.pdf

    Jan Meisels Allen
    Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 11:16 am

    How to Find Polish Archival Records That Have Been Indexed on JewishGen

    Advice from Jewish Digest 9/19/17

    The FamilySearch help file suggests there are two situations where you can see
    digitized records. One is that the Notes section for a catalog item may say in
    red that the item is available online. This is the case, for example, with
    census records (revision lists) for Soroca, Moldova (Soroki, Bessarabia). Then
    you can browse the microfilmed images on your computer.

    Or, you may see a microfilm number and a camera icon. In that case you can view
    the digital images, but only at a Family History Center or affiliated library
    unless you are a church member. For example, this happens with Jewish records
    from Simferopol, Crimea.

    Alan Shuchat
    Newton, MA

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 11:22 am

    ONLINE RECORDS AND INDEXES – A TREASURY OF INFORMATION

    FROM THE JEWISH GENEALOGY SOCIETY OF BROOKLYN

    http://www.jgsob.org/resources.html

    For example, item 24 lists a link entitled “Search the Polish Archives.”

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:44 pm

    FAMILY TREE WEBINAR

    Family Tree Webinars sponsored a webinar last night with Michael J. Leclerc, CG on “Writing Up Your Research”. The webinar was excellent, examining different ways of writing up and publishing your research including blogs and books. The webinar is part of the Legacy Family Tree Webinars Series, which offers a multitude of webinars, many free.

    I was attracted to this webinar as I want to preserve the work I’ve done in some form, but am not sure how this is best done.

    Michael Leclerc CG is a well-known international genealogist. He worked for 17 years at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, then joined Mocavo as Chief Genealogists. In 2015 he started Genealogy Professor providing genealogy education opportunities to family historians.

    Legacy Family Tree Webinars are free at the time of the webinar, and for a few days thereafter. Following the free period there is a minimal charge ($10.00-$12.00USD) per webinar to download.

    To see the list of upcoming webinars on Legacy Family Tree Webinars go to: http://familytreewebinars.com/upcoming-webinars.php

    A list of BCG webinars that have been given see: http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars/ Some are free and are so noted.

    To learn more about the presenter, Michael Leclerc, visit his websites at http://www.mjleclerc.com and Facebook.com/michaeljleclerc.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:45 pm

    WORKSHOP ON ‘CHANGES OF BORDERS’ GIVEN February 7, 2017

    Hal Bookbinder’s Workshop presentation on Changes of Borders in Eastern Europe was excellent. The handout is available on the Workshop Presentations page, which is in the member’s only area. In the lab section Hal gave some suggestions on learning about the geography, history and culture of your ancestral shtetls. Here they are:

    1. Google ‘maps online,’ then click on David Rumsey Historical Map Collection. There’s a wealth of information on this site, including links to maps, videos, atlases, LUNA browser, Google Earth, etc.

    2. Go on jewish gen.org, then click on ‘search for a town’. This will give you its location, different names for it, and political status in the past 116 years. Click on JewishGen Communities data base (http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/) and you will find links to more information about your town.

    3. Kehilalinks data bases. A Kehila “…….is any city, town or village anywhere in the world which had a Jewish community at any time in its history — a place that has or once had a synagogue, or a Jewish cemetery, or other signs of Jewish communal life.” (JewishGen). If you go to the Kehilalinks web site, [http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/documentation/Policy.htm] and put in your town you will come upon a very rich web site full of information about your town, a blog you can participate in, names of special interest groups (SIGs) dealing with that town, family databases and names of people you could contact to answer questions you might have. My town was Izyaslav, Ukraine, I was the web master for it, and learned a great deal from the experience.

    4. Hal also mentioned several excellent Atlases. One is The Times Atlas of European History, published by the Times of London in 1994. A hard cover is for sale on Amazon for $9.24, can’t beat that, eh? He also recommended the Atlas of Modern jewish History, hardcover published 1990, offered by Amazon.

    5. He also recommended a video on youtube.com called Borders of Poland throughout the ages. There are 2 beautifully illustrated fairly short videos, and on the same pages multiple other links to sites discussing Polands dynamic history and changing borders. The amount of information available is both exciting and scary. Prepare to devote a lot of time.

    6. If you bloggers discover more relevant, helpful sites please add them to the blog, by pressing reply under this blog.

    7. Please note that I’m conveying Hal’s suggestions, I’m not endorsing any of this information. Please research carefully any material you wish to purchase.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:49 pm

    DNA RESOURCES & TOM HIRSCH’S WEB SITE LIST – 2 GREAT NEW DOCUMENTS

    I would strongly urge JGSGO members to access and utilize two valuable resources that Tom Hirsch, our VP of Program Development, has created. They can be found within the members only menu. They are a treasure trove of very helpful and informative web sites which will help all of us traverse the obstacle course many of us encounter in our genealogy searches. As you read these comments, we’d appreciate any suggestions you might have.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:49 pm

    Ancestry Genealogy Toolkit

    This is a free list of very useful links, charts, and suggestions provided by Ancestry.

    http://c.ancestry.com/cs/media/social-genealogy-toolkit.pdf

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:52 pm

    The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter Article: How to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets

    Dick Eastman, an accomplished genealogist, is the author of an excellent & free newsletter called The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter. His website gives directions on how to subscribe to his newsletter.

    He recently wrote an article called “How to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets,” published on the Familysearch.org web site. It discusses the vital topic of preserving genealogical archives.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 3:58 pm

    FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE 18 GREAT TIPS FOR ALL OF US

    Family Tree Magazine in their February issue has published 18 very helpful tips for the beginner or experienced genealogist. CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK: Family Tree Magazine 18 great tips

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 4:00 pm

    Discover old European postcards

    The Kehilalinks Owners Digest pointed out the availability of a website created by Frantisek Banyai, of Prague, Czech Republic that offers the opportunity to browse a collection online of old Jewish-European postcards. It includes most of the countries where Jews lived for centuries and presents pictures of synagogues, ghettos, gatherings, etc. CLICK on http://www.judaica.cz.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    September 27, 2017 @ 4:01 pm

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM)

    The USHMM is a great research to not only research the holocaust but also to search for names of victims killed during the holocaust. It hosts a collection of 7 million names and its collection continues to grow. These names can be searched online. Click on the following to access the web site: https://www.ushmm.org/remember

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    March 19, 2018 @ 10:52 am

    Subject: New Book: Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy, 2018 Edition
    From: gary@mokotoff.net
    Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2018 09:19:50 -0400
    X-Message-Number: 1

    Avotaynu has just published the 2018 version of “Getting Started in Jewish
    Genealogy.” The book has been regularly updated since 2010 because of the
    dynamic growth of Jewish genealogy research. New additions to the 2018
    version includes a section on Facebook groups for Jewish genealogy and an
    expansion of the section on DNA testing. Also, statistical data about sizes
    of the numerous databases mentioned have been updated.

    The book is not a beginner’s guide, but a primer to demonstrate that there
    is a world of records and resources to help you to trace your Jewish family
    history. It is only 104 pages, making it quick reading, yet it holds a
    wealth of information. An appendix includes a case study to demonstrate that
    tracing your Jewish ancestry can be done. The appendix documents how the
    book’s author traced the ancestry of the notorious Bernie Madoff back six
    generations using only internet resources. The research included the
    challenge that the name was changed to Madoff “at Ellis Island.”

    Additional information, including the Table of Contents, is available at
    http://www.avotaynu.com/books/GettingStarted.htm.

    Gary Mokotoff

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    July 31, 2018 @ 4:03 pm

    Gene Starn was a founder and long time member of JGSGO. He passed away on Saturday, July 14, 2018. He’s had a very interesting career. His obituary published in the Heritage may be viewed here.

    http://www.heritagefl.com/story/2018/07/27/life-cycles/gene-starn-dies-at-age-94/10142.html

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    February 25, 2019 @ 4:42 pm

    Travel of Jews from Russia 19th-20th Centuries

    If you have any questions about migrants from Russian during the period mentioned, you might consider 2 sources of information:
    1. The book “Bread to Eat and Clothes to Wear: Letters from Jewish Migrants in the
    Early Twentieth Century” – which is available through Amazon.com and
    2. The JewishGen Yizkor Books Project will sometimes have stories referring to
    this migration process.
    This information was made know on JewishGen blog, 2/24/19.

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    June 9, 2019 @ 11:28 am

    FROM JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP DIGEST 06/08/2019

    Finding Immigrant Names On Degraded Ellis Island Manifests

    Hi Group,

    For the past few years I have been researching how to find immigrant records
    on degraded Ellis Island manifest pages. About 5% of such ship pages showed
    some sheet damage (ripped, creased, etc.) when they were filmed in 1943 and
    1944. I’ve shared that research in my talks, and by answering and helping
    Jenners trying to find “missing” people on the Ellis Island indexes. As was
    recently announced, I’ve now put that experience to paper in an essay that
    is posted in the JewishGen InfoFiles titled “Finding Immigrant Names on
    Degraded Ellis Island Manifests.”

    See: https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Degradedmanifests.html

    In the InfoFile I discuss 10 different approaches for finding or at least
    getting some clues to these difficult passengers, and show why some
    strategies work and others will never work no matter how many name
    variations you use. There are two main situations on degraded manifests that
    reduce the chances of successful searches.

    The first situation is the use of ellipses in the Ellis Island Database
    (EIDB), created in the 1990s by the Church of Jesus Christ volunteers.
    Volunteer transcribers replaced a missing part of a name on a ripped page
    (usually the front of the name) with “…”, or substituted “…” for part of
    a name that the transcriber could not decipher (e.g. W…in…raub for
    Weintraub in one case). The JewishGen InfoFile, “Ellis Island Database FAQ
    & Tips”, discusses the illegible name ellipsis problem. There are about
    425,000 Ellis Island passenger names on the EIDB that contain an ellipsis or
    about 3.5% of the often cited 12 million immigrants that passed through
    Ellis Island. How many of these could be attributed to degraded pages, and
    not illegible handwriting? Using as representative of a degraded manifest
    the SS Sicilia’s NY voyage in 1907, 79/546 of its passengers have partial
    names (the rest of the name ripped off) on the filmed manifest or about
    14%. If my very broad assumptions work, then I would expect that 5%
    (chance of degraded page) x 14% (chance a name on those degraded pages is a
    partial) = 0.7%. Therefore of the 12 million immigrants, I would expect
    about 84,000 of them to have a name containing an ellipsis as a result of
    damaged sheets.

    The second situation is where the entire passenger name no longer exists on
    the degraded manifest (but some or all of the rest of the line may still be
    intact). How many names/lines of the 12 million might be impacted by this
    problem? Using again the SS Sicilia 1907 voyage, 68/546 of its passengers
    no longer showed any part of their name on the filmed manifest or about 12%.
    (Their lines were not transcribed for the EIDB.) Thus 5% x 12% = 0.6% or
    about 75,000 passengers of the 12 million immigrants.

    I thank JewishGen for posting my essay and I hope it is helpful to
    researchers confronted by degraded manifests and other situations of
    difficult Ellis Island passenger searches.

    Joel Weintraub
    Dana Point, CA
    census1950@cox.net

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    August 12, 2019 @ 9:41 am

    FROM THE JEWISH DIGEST 8/11/19 – MILLIONS OF BOOKS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN

    Subject: (US) Millions of Books Are in Public Domain Due to Quirk of Copyright Law
    From:
    Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2019 11:08:08 -0700
    X-Message-Number: 2

    Prior to 1964, most US published books had a 28-year copyright term. To
    extend the copyright the authors or publishers had to send in a separate
    form. That did not happen in many cases, meaning they are in the public
    domain today. Why prior to 1964? The Copyright Act of 1992 pushed the
    date back established in The Copyright Act of 1976 and did away with
    renewal for books published after January 1, 1964. See NYPL blog post
    below for list of copyright laws and dates. Through the 1970s, the
    Library of Congress published the Catalog of Copyright Entries, all the
    registration and renewals of America’s books.

    The New York Public Library (NYPL) took the effort to make those books
    free online today. The NYPL recently blogged about Copyright History at:
    https://www.nypl.org/blog/2019/05/31/us-copyright-history-1923-1964

    This was not an easy task. The NYPL converted the registration and
    copyright information into a searchable format, making the old
    copyrights searchable and now knowing when, and if, they were renewed.

    Around 80 percent of all the books published from 1923 to 1964 are in the
    public domain and free. The NYPL blog post (see above) they covered
    copyright history. They state there are 642,000 registered copyrights with
    only 25 percent (162,000) having renewed their copyright, the remaining
    480,000 are probably in the public domain. To read more see the
    aforementioned URL. I would encourage you to read the article as it
    includes the convoluted history on copyright and what they have done to
    list the books.

    The Internet Archive https://archive.org/search.php has digital copies of
    the books. I entered into the search bar “Jewish” (54,000 entries); “Jewish
    Genealogy” (435 entries); and “Genealogy”(146,000 entries)

    The Hathi Trust https://www.hathitrust.org/ , is a digital library has
    uploaded some of the newly free books.

    The bottom line is there are many books of interest on genealogy, Jewish
    genealogy and general Jewish category that are no longer under copyright
    protection and may be downloaded from the above sources.

    To read more see: https://tinyurl.com/yxp8fgvq
    Original url:
    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/kz4e3e/millions-of-books-are-secretly-in-the-public-domain-you-can-download-them-free

    Jan Meisels Allen
    Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

    Reply

  • bsieger007
    October 2, 2019 @ 1:26 pm

    Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay Meeting
    Three Minutes in Poland
    A Video – “Discovering A Lost World in a 1938 Family Film”

    Sunday, November 10, 2019
    The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet at Gulf Coast Jewish Family & Community Services, 14041 Icot Blvd., Clearwater, Florida on Sunday November 10, 2019 for a film presentation of Three Minutes in Poland by Glenn Kurtz. A social with refreshments and library access begins at 1:30 PM, and the featured program starts at 2:00 PM.

    In 2008, Glenn Kurtz discovered a more than 70-year-old family film that included 3 minutes of footage shot in his family’s ancestral Polish village by his grandfather during a 1938 European vacation. This discovery led Kurtz on a 4-year journey to identify people in this film, track down the few who survived and were still living, and to meticulously piece together the story of a place and its people that were annihilated in the Holocaust. Kurtz’s book “Three Minutes in Poland” details his inspiring journey to learn about the forgotten village of Nasielsk, Poland. Carefully assembled from interviews, photographs, documents, and artifacts, Three Minutes in Poland tells the rich, funny, harrowing, and surprisingly intertwined stories from the seven survivors of Nasielsk, Poland that he was able to track down and interview.
    His historical reconstruction, how he found families of the images in this film, interviews of people who he helped to remember details they didn’t know existed inside themselves is documented in this film. He discovers the life of a village that was vibrant with Jewish life before the German occupation of Poland. His research shows us methods, the meaning, the history, and the importance of what we can do as genealogists. His research and findings should be an inspiration to all genealogists who are seeking to discover their own family story.

    Glenn Kurtz is a writer, published author and university professor. He is the host of Conversations on Practice, a series of public conversations about writing held at McNally Jackson Books in New York City. He has a PhD from Stanford University and has taught at Stanford University, San Francisco State University, and California College of the Arts.

    Anyone interested in Jewish family history and in learning how to do Jewish genealogical research is invited to attend this and all meetings of the JGSTB. Beginners as well as experienced researchers are welcome. There is no charge to attend this meeting. For information about the organization or for directions to the meeting call Bruce Hadburg at 727-796-7981, or email him at bhadburg@tampabay.rr.com.

    Reply

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